Patterns of world history volume 2 pdf

This is a good article. Follow the patterns of world history volume 2 pdf for more information. Norman Wilkinson explained in 1919 that he had intende

This is a good article. Follow the patterns of world history volume 2 pdf for more information. Norman Wilkinson explained in 1919 that he had intended dazzle primarily to mislead the enemy about a ship’s course and so to take up a poor firing position. Each ship’s dazzle pattern was unique to avoid making classes of ships instantly recognisable to the enemy.

The result was that a profusion of dazzle schemes was tried, and the evidence for their success was at best mixed. So many factors were involved that it was impossible to determine which were important, and whether any of the colour schemes were effective. The approach was developed after Allied navies were unable to develop effective means to hide ships in all weather conditions. 1914 explaining the goal was to confuse, not to conceal, by disrupting a ship’s outline. Eyepiece image of a warship in a naval rangefinder, image halves not yet adjusted for range. The target’s masts are especially useful for rangefinding, so Kerr proposed disrupting these with white bands.

Taking up the zebra example, Kerr proposed that the vertical lines of ships’ masts be disrupted with irregular white bands. Hiding these would make ships less conspicuous, and would “greatly increase the difficulty of accurate range finding”. For example, he proposed painting ships’ guns grey on top, grading to white below, so the guns would disappear against a grey background. Similarly, he advised painting shaded parts of the ship white, and brightly lit parts in grey, again with smooth grading between them, making shapes and structures invisible.