Futuhat al makkiyya urdu pdf

Abū Ya’qūb Yūsuf I, and became one of his military advisers. Morocco and took his final leave from his master Yūsuf al-Kūmī, who was living in the vil

Abū Ya’qūb Yūsuf I, and became one of his military advisers. Morocco and took his final leave from his master Yūsuf al-Kūmī, who was living in the village futuhat al makkiyya urdu pdf Salé at that time. Mediaeval list of Ibn Arabi’s books.

Later in 604 AH he returned to Mecca where he continued to study and write, spending his time with his friend Abū Shujā bin Rustem and family, including the beautiful Niẓām. Arabī’s life were spent in these lands and he also kept travelling and holding the reading sessions of his works in his own presence. Muslims who had witnessed generation directly. Ibn Arabi in one of his most prolific works entitled Fusus al-Hikam. Taking an idea already common within Sufi culture, Ibn al-Arabi applied deep analysis and reflection on the issue of the Perfect Human and one’s pursuit in fulfilling this goal. In developing his explanation of the perfect being al-Arabi first discusses the issue of oneness through the metaphor of the mirror.

In this metaphor al-Arabi compares an object being reflected in countless mirrors to the relationship between God and his creatures. God’s essence is seen in the existent human being, as God is the object and humans being the mirrors. Meaning two things, that since humans are mere reflections of God there can be no distinction or separation between the two and without God the creatures would be non- existent. When an individual understands that there is no separation between human and God they begin on the path of ultimate oneness. The one who decides to walk in this oneness pursues the true reality and responds to God’s longing to be known. The search within for this Reality of oneness causes one to be reunited with God, as well as, improve self-consciousness. The Perfect Human, through this developed self-consciousness and self-realization, prompts divine self-manifestation.

This causes the Perfect Human to be of both divine and earthly origin, al-Arabi calls him the Isthmus. Being the Isthmus between heaven and Earth the perfect human fulfills God’s desire to be known and God’s presence can be realized through him by others. Additionally through self manifestation one acquires divine knowledge, which is the primordial spirit of Muhammad and all its perfection. Al- Arabi details that the perfect human is of the cosmos to the divine and conveys the divine spirit to the cosmos. Al-Arabi contemplated the Logos, or “Universal Man”, as a mediation between the individual human and the divine essence. Perfect Man who exemplifies the morality of God.

Ibn Arabi regards Muhammad as the supreme human being and master of all creatures. Muhammad is therefore the primary role-model for human beings to aspire to emulate. Ibn Arabi believes that God’s attributes and names are manifested in this world and that the most complete and perfect display of these divine attributes and names are seen in Muhammad. Ibn Arabi believes that one may see God in the mirror of Muhammad, meaning that the divine attributes of God are manifested through Muhammad.

Ibn Arabi maintains that Muhammad is the best proof of God and by knowing Muhammad one knows God. Ibn Arabi also maintains that Muhammad is the master of all of humanity in both this world and the afterlife. Muslim scholars have often held strong, polarized views regarding the viewpoints and character of Ibn Arabi. Many have declared Ibn Arabi to be the foremost spiritual leader and Sufi master in Muslim history. Others regarded him as a heretic or even an apostate.

Very few have had neutral or lukewarm reactions. Muslim scholar respected by both Ibn Arabi’s supporters and detractors, has been of note due to disputes over whether he himself was a supporter or detractor. All parties have claimed to have transmitted Ibn ‘Abd as-Salam’s comments from his student Ibn Sayyid al-Nas, yet the two sides have transmitted very different accounts. Some 800 works are attributed to Ibn Arabi, although only some have been authenticated.